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20130228
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
to start all over. >> eva rowe's parents were among the 15 who died that day in texas city. it was the worst workplace accident in this country in 16 years. >> these things do not have to happen. they are preventable. they're predictable, and people do not have to die because they're earning a living. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. oil is the engine that drives our economy. and as oil becomes scarcer, the push to discover and develop new sources becomes increasingly dangerous. this edition examines two recent disasters in the oil industry with a great deal in common: the deepwater horizon rig in the gulf of mexico and the refinery at texas city, which suffered explosions five years apart. they were both operated by bp. and in both cases, 60 minutes looked at whether bp's cost saving measures may have had deadly consequences. first we'll look at the biggest off shore oil spill in history, the blowout of the deepwater horizon drilling rig in 2010. critical revelations in the disaster have come from one of the last crewmen to escape the rig, mike williams,
mayor ed koch. the mayor who helped america's biggest city make a big comeback from bankruptcy and a very bad image. we're going to talk with some people who really knew him and his legacy in just a few moments. but first up, sundaying super bowl will be the first in new orleans since hurricane katrina. brian schactman is live in new orleans tonight. good evening, brian. >> hi, larry. you know, the mercedes-benz superdome right over my shoulder seven years ago was in absolute tatters. now it has mercedes-benz as a sponsor with a $100 million ten-year deal, and it's absolutely beautiful. the city has been transformed since katrina in '05, and of course the bp spill in 2010. they spent about 300 million upgrading the superdome. another 300 million upgrading the airport. and another 400 million on various other projects in the city. i've been down there about four times in the last four years, larry. the city has never looked better. and also on a jobs day i do want to note the unemployment rate in the city of new orleans right now is under 5%. so if anything could say they came b
to throw atlantic city a life line and collect some revenue sos they can cut tax rates across the board for everybody. this is "the kudlow report" and we begin right now. >>> before we jump in let me give you my continuing optimistic view of this market. yes the fed remains easy. that's huge. you know what else? the there are is strong. no interests in gold. good numbers on homes sales, consumer confidence and core capital goods. profits are rising modestly and finally my contrary view that the budget cutting sequester which will limit government is pro growth for the economy and winds up being pro wealth creation for stocks. i think the sequester is part of the market's rally and that sequester is only two days way. the markets know all about it. so i'm still playing this from the optimistic side. let us get into focus on that very sequester. cnbc contributor robert costa joins us live from washington. he has the latest news on the sequester. there's some weird stuff going on out there. help me. first of all, a sequester is due on friday whenever the president signs it or whatever and
, and that in other countries, cyber attacks have plunged entire cities into darkness. >> president obama didn't say which country had been plunged into darkness by computer hackers, but we found out. it was brazil. we also found out that hackers have been infiltrating everything from our defense networks to the financial systems. bank robbers are now stealing more money with computers than they are with guns. >> this map is showing a visual representation of where all of the known infections of conficker are across the world. >> computer analysts say it's like a sleeper cell, and it may be poised to suck sensitive data out of millions and millions of computers. >> it takes time to read the manuals. i'm gonna save you that time. 'cause i stay home on saturday nights and read them for you. >> you and the rest of the geeks? >> there's millions of us out there. >> everybody, let's hear it! geek squad! [cheering] >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. in this edition, we take a look at technology. we examine how breaches in digital security threaten everything from weapons systems to bank ac
, even new york city now with blizzard warnings, expecting 12 to 18 inches there. this is going to be a blockbuster storm. the big question is can we get everybody off the roads in time? that's what the desire is hout . the government says, look, i want all unnecessary vehicles off the road by noon tomorrow. so if we have a scene like you see behind me here, larry, where i-93 is backlogged at this time tomorrow night, we're going to have a disaster on our hands. that means some of these people are going to be spend being the night in their cars riding out the storm. 35 years ago the famous blizzard of '78 it was rush hour and people got trapped in their cars. if they are in their cars this time, the same thing will happen. history will repeat itself. we will also have hurricane force gusts along the coastline. some of these areas that were weakened by sandy will be very, very vulnerable certainly to the storm surge and the wave action that will happen with this huge nor'easter. we expect to measure this one with a yard stick, larry, two to three feet expected here in boston. >>
, it was for a story about the harlem children's zone, an inner-city education program run by a remarkable man named geoffrey canada... >> good morning, boys and girls. >> and considered one of the most ambitious social experiments to alleviate poverty in our lifetime. >> if you work hard... >> but back then, there was no way to tell if the experiment was working. today the results are in, and they're nothing short of stunning. just ask richar anozier. do you know what college you want to go to? >> stanford. >> what do you want to do after stanford? >> i would like to earn my way to being a ceo. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm bob simon. in this edition, we look at three groundbreaking approaches to education. first, we visit the seed public charter school, the nation's first urban public boarding school. later, we meet some unlikely students who are getting a liberal arts college degree behind bars. and finally, we go to the harlem children's zone under the leadership of geoffrey canada. we begin with seed, one of the most successful and innovative charter schools in the country. it was start
. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. >>> here is a real sizzle story. facebook billionaire mark zuckerberg is hosting his first political fund-raiser tonight. guess who it's for? new jersey governor chris christie, out of the left coast with all of those silicon valley folks. who would have thunk it. julia is live outside his house. >> good evening. the security is already tight. we have helicopters overhead. everyone is getting ready for the big event when zuckerberg invites his friends to meet chris christie. christie is raising his profile as a bipartisan leader ahead of his 2016 prospective run for president. this led tozuckerberg's $100 million education grant, which he announced on oprah. >> the main thing that i have to do is find people who are going to be really great leaders and invest in them. that's what we're doing here. we're setting up a $100 million challenge grant. >> zuckerberg has been doubling down on education philanthropy since then. he and his wife donated 18 million facebook shares to th
with her? >> jon stewart ripped her to shreds. >> the point that's valid is we are big city folk. in the smaller, rural parts of the country and you can speak to the congressmen representing the districts the post office is the central meeting place. i have never been to these places. there is something going on there. i respect that. >> if you go on a listening tour. >> i should. >> you're making the right point. this point will come up later with the military. it's so widely distributed. everybody has an impact on this. we do live in big cities but people in kansas don't have the same relationship. >> shouldn't have to pay for that. >> you can't have everything you want in life. i have a number. $47 trillion. do you know what $47 trillion is? from the cbo, congressional budget office, that's u.s. federal spending for the next ten years. $47 trillion. okay? can we agree that's a big number? now the post office will add to that number. i think we should be subtracting from that number. i don't care what sentimentality or who claire mchaskill is. she shouldn't have run the race. s
basically the chicago city workers, the chicago public unions are all going to be put into the health insurance exchanges. that is the way chicago is going to get out of whatever it is, its $8 billion unfunded liability. if he does it, then cities and states all across the country are going to dump their union employees right into the health insurance exchange and that is going to break the bank completely. >> that's exactly right. and that's exactly what they're asking in this provision now with these jointly run employer union plans. we want to be able to send our employees to these exchanges. the law is already costing 2.6 trillion over ten years. what would that do? and then who's to say that it's -- of course you couldn't just limit it to union employees. anybody who has a job should then be able to get coverage. >> but the idea of putting these government union workers into the exchange was not -- as far as i know, was not ever really expected. i mean, phil, this is a new twist. for rahm emanuel -- maybe it's very clever. get out from under his unfunded liability. maybe the u.s.
breathe better. (blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. glue you can so that's kansas city. a car apparently hit a gas main in kansas city. we're keeping on ice on it to see if he get information, as i say if we get key information, we'll get to you right away. >>> like a scene at a big gangster movie, a well-organized crew steals $50 million worth of diamonds. keirin simmons mass the detail. >> reporter: it was brazen escapes in millions in diamonds without firing a shot, leaving nothing but a burned-out van. the men were in two vehicles. they drove through a hole cut in the airport security fence and made straight for a brinks delivery plan. they filled the vehicles with boxes of gems, then fled back through the fence. it took just three minutes. now the diamond trade is left scratching their heads and wonders if this was some kind of inside job that the robbers knew the diamonds would be there. they've been taken from antwerp, the capital of the diamond trait. where ten years ago the biggest heist took place. once again they find themselves wondering how could it happen again?
york city. what does this thing look like you to? >> well, i hate to disagree with you. and i hate to have to defend the president here. but for you to say that president obama came one a bad program, the sequester thing, is one of the few plans he's ever come up with that i like. and any cabinet member that cannot make a cut of 1.25% should immediately step down. he's not capable of managing if he can't make those cuts in a reasonable and rational way. this is the same game we always play. when you have to make a little cut, you claim we have to cut food safety, we have to cut airline security. you absolutely don't. there's enough waste and bloating you could make reasonable cuts. >> this is obama's plan. and this is a good thing. this is like the drones. i like the drones and i like the sequester. but he's disowning the sequester. >> but they let him get away with it. we've got to make this clear. this is obama's plan. he designed it. he created it. >> republicans also back the sequester. they're both responsible for this mess. and it's a mess. and i think what's going to happen,
large cities were lined with gaming establishments called bucket shops, where people could place wagers on whether the price of stocks would go up or down without actually buying them. this unfettered speculation contributed to the panic and stock market crash of 1907, and state laws all over the country were enacted to ban them. >> big headlines, huge type. this is the front page of the new york times. >> "no bucket shops for new law to hit." >> so they'd already closed up, 'cause the law was coming. here's a picture of one of them. and they were like parlors. see? >> betting parlors. >> betting parlors, yeah. >> it was a felony. well, it was a felony when a law came into effect, because it had brought down the market in 1907. and they said, "we're not gonna let this happen again." and then 100 years later in 2000, we rolled them all back. >> a bill to reauthorize and amend the commodity exchange act to promote... >> the vehicle for doing this was an obscure but critical piece of federal legislation called the commodity futures modernization act of 2000. and the bill was a big favorite
unit nine. some of the world's cleanest gas turbines are now powering some of america's biggest cities. siemens. answers. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um, i see a duck. be more specific. i see the aflac duck. i see the aflac duck out of work and not making any money. i see him moving in with his parents and selling bootleg dvds out of the back of a van. dude, that's your life. remember, aflac will give him cash to help cover his rent, car payments and keep everything as normal as possible. i see lunch. [ monitor beeping ] let's move on. [ male announcer ] find out what a hospital stay could really cost you at aflac.com. >>> >>> does the president want to knock them around from one side of the chamber to the other? joining us now howard feinman and kate overshane. kate centerist? >> i think we are going to see hyper partisan but i think he is going to ratchet it up a couple of notches. i think they are going to say they will take food out of the moumgs of babies. it will be the same republicans hate the middle class. >> with a 1.
for the city. you like solyndra meets beyonce. >> esiason said -- >> he's a great reporter. he won a pulitzer, right? >> mvp. boomer says there was a weird buzzing sound after beyonce finished. can you tell the audience what that was all about? >> all i can say is it takes a tremendous amount of energy to do what she did in terms of electricity. then it stops and the second half started and there was a play and all of the sudden it went dancrk. there is a chance they continued to suck in the energy, they didn't e need it and it needed to go somewhere. >> if they find out, they won't tell us. >> they might have to. some agencies may be involved in this. >> they may have lost 2018. >> they may have. >> thank you very much. >>> now, remember when democrats used to be afraid to admit they want to raise your taxes? president obama and the democrats don't seem to have a care in the world. they are all admitting the truth. is that a great idea politically? another tax hike. how about the economy? next up on kudlow. i'm lorenzo. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. tha
. and then the other half, 60, so you get an average. sonny in illinois. >> caller: a big booyah from the windy city. i love your show. long time fan. >> i appreciate it. >> caller: the company is huntsman, h u.n. >> go with georgia gulf. buy, buy, buy. go to john in florida. >> caller: jim, i would like your latest take on arena pharmaceutical. >> @jimcramer on twitter, because i didn't fall in love with this stock, a lot of people despise me. i know people are in love with it. i am not in love with it. be but let's go to carl in arkansas. >> caller: greetings from arkansas. i am thinking of picking up a bank stock, your thoughts of new york community bank. >> the yield is so much higher than all the others, i will send you to keen. i don't know, it is a nice gain. i prefer key. i like the safety. that, ladies and gentlemen, is the conclusion of the lightning round! >>> ina bull market, it is easier to pick stock that can go higher. this is what a bull market looks like. what is more lucrative is picking stocks that go higher. we have stocks like allergan, it makes real medicine, a leading player in t
systems go. and cramer fave kansas city southern, ksu, $103, all-time record and it may be in talks to build a major hub to bring domestic oil to texas refineries. they're shipping by train. and it is so important to get an outlet for the domestic oil, and ksu is the preferred way to play it. a terrific stock because of the smoking hot mexican trunk line. how do we know this isn't a transport blip? would you see companies make truck engines and components for trucks like cummins, $2.39 and remarkable runs all, nowhere near as amazing as boeing. the supposedly hobbled pitiful helpless giant maker of planes that isn't supposed to be able to fly any time soon, if you read the press reports. why the heck is it 66 cents from the 52-week high, how about because they place huge orders with the company, because it may be, despite what the press reports you hear and see the finest manufacturer in the world. they will fix this problem faster than anyone believes possible. that abundance of orders makes sense given that the airlines are the most solvent i have ever seen them and i think -- get
year's going to bring. mike in illinois. mike? >> caller: cramer, this is mike in the windy city giving you a chicago bears b-b-boo-yah. >> what's up? >> caller: if i short a stock, how long do i have to cover that short? >> forever. forever. that's one of the great things about shorting. stay short for as long as you want. if the stock goes up, they may ask you to put more money up, though, and that's where people get squeezed. okay. you've got to dig deep if you want deep profits.รง gross margins will guide you in figuring out the direction of a stock. and some things you'll only find on the conference calls, not the headlines. gross margins, that's on the call. stay with cramer. >>> you're hearing tonight for the first time not how to figure out what's a better or worse expected earnings report to do a good trade. seems to be a dominant way of thinking. how to put these reports to work for you. select the best stocks and prune those that need to go. talking longer term perspective. we figured out how to compute the growth rate of a company. something that @jimcramer on twitter, i ke
in and dig out. another big concern especially in some of the areas outside of the city is a loss of power. these winds are going to get to hurricane strength in some areas, and that's going to threaten the power lines. now, over the last day or day and a half, we've obviously seen a run on all of the hardware and home improvement stores in this area. but also the grocery stores. people getting the food they need to sustain themselves for several days, saying they realize they will probably be in their homes for an extended period of time. that's the very latest here in boston. i'm jay gray, nbc news. now back to you. >> all right. many thanks to jay gray. we appreciate it. >>> now, the president might have some senate democrats on his side as they scramble to find replacement cuts for the march 1st across the board sequester. but according to the latest from ace pollster scott rasmussen, only 36% of likely voters think oklahoma should find a way to stop the automatic cuts from going into effect. scott rasmussen, founder and president of rusmussen report joined me. scott as always welcome
water fountains for the master and the mutt. there are buildings in new york city, chicago, boston that are all catering to pets and people are paying for it. they're paying up to $500 as a down payment and 50 bucks a month in d.c. here. and probably a lot higher in manhattan. i've heard of pawdicures for the dogs. and this chauffeur services. they can provide that. even doggy food trucks. there is no end to it, larry. >> we get our dog groomed every two weeks. >> that's grooming. but does it get the pawdicure. >> sometimes, actually. sometimes. let me show it. can i show it on the air? this is the newest contender. there he is. that's grace. she is a terrier. they have one, actually, in the terrier category at the westminster kennel club. at that point she was only a few months, six months or so old. i'm not going to say how old the guy is on the chair. that's a different subject altogether. but you know what i heard? 100,000 bucks a year to train and groom these dogs. >> it's no surprise whatsoever. when people are spending this kind of money at home if you're talking about a sho
york university. today's "wall street journal" questions the big bonus citi paid lew. sounds a lot like revolving door crony capitalism. that's right. back with us now is mike ozanian, steve mcmahon, and kay bailey hutchison. mike, i don't know this guy. i don't know. i don't know why nyu had to give him a special severance payment. he left voluntarily. i don't know why citigroup had to give him a bonus. he went to the federal government. the stipulation was if you go work for the federal government, we will guarantee you a bonus. not if you go work for the red cross or a non-profit. this sounds to me like crony capitalism revolving door. >> you know what? i have so much respect for tim geithner, that to me this seems like such a downgrade. it's very disturbing to me. it bothers me even more than the nomination of chuck hagel. it just seems like the president is totally disengaged. no one vetted this guy. it's just crony capitalism, as you said. and the president spoke so vehemently for so long that this was something he was going to put a stop to. >> that's a key point. he talked about
york city. that's not for a while now. but more important they're spending big on the nordstrom website. nordstrom's is moving aggressively into mobile. last year, mobile devices accounted for a fifth of the total sales and it grew at a 31% clip last quarter. it can help the stock to continue to power higher in a world where everyone gets 3 and 4-g. the next gatsby component, how about ralph lauren. maybe this isn't the best example. this is the premiere high end apparel brand. nothing says preppy like polo. they earned 240 a share. these companies are doing better even if their stocks aren't. and it gave very healthy guidance for 2013. this is what happens when you have a brand that's perceived to be on the high end of things. the money flows in because people cannot resist a little conspicuous consumption. this can be a perilous game. look at coach. they're a dog because they're widely perceived as having fallen behind on the style curve with its merchandise. i don't think ralph lauren will fall prey because they have staying power and they have some great merchants and designers. ral
-clenching, teeth-rattling ride on an unpaved road from the capital city to the hospital. >> why do they call this a highway? >> you got me. you got me, buddy. it's the principle artery through central haiti. >> if the ride doesn't break your back, what you see when you arrive will break your heart. the squatter settlement of cange is one of the poorest parts of the poorest country in the western hemisphere. >> [speaking french] >> the desperate need paul farmer saw here as a young man inspired him and four friends to create partners in health. they raised money and built what's become the largest hospital in central haiti. >> [speaking french] >> how many lives do you think partners in health have saved? >> in medicine we say t.n.t.c.: too numerous to count. too numerous to count. >> what began as a small, understaffed, ill-equipped clinic in 1985 today has 100 inpatient beds, an array of specialists, and three operating rooms. they have nearly two million patients visits a year. >> [speaking french] >> and the medical care here is free. for paul farmer, health care is a human right. he want
small trading companies around the world, some based in cities right here in the united states. >> are you a procurement agent for iran? >> [chortles] no, that's ridiculous. no. >> but of course that's sort of the implication of the case against you. >> i'm nothing to do with iranian government or things like that at all. >> mohammad vaghari, mitch to his friends, an iranian who's lived in the united states for 15 years, is facing up to 85 years in prison. he and his lawyers are preparing for his trial on charges that he conspired to send u.s. technology to iran through a trading company he set up in his basement apartment in philadelphia. you are charged with trying to buy a centrifuge that could be used to make biological weapons, like anthrax. >> i don't know about that. i'm not a biological expert to tell, you know-- >> that's in the affidavit and is part of... >> sure. >> the charges against you? >> yes. that's what they say. >> he says his client for the centrifuge was a science lab at a university in dubai. but he says he never bought it. he only asked for its price. >>
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)